Shutter Speed Priority

ShutterSpeed_

What is shutter speed?

The shutter speed refers to the length of time the opening in the lens remains open to let light into the camera and onto the sensor. The shutter speed can be as fast as 1/10,000 of a second or as slow as several minutes.

How does your choice of shutter speed affect the photograph?

Fast shutter speeds have the effect of freezing motion in the scene you are photographing. Conversely, slow shutter speeds will blur motion in a scene. Both of these can be used to great creative effect.

The chart below shows how different shutter speeds would effect the sense of motion if you were photographing a person running. Fast shutter speeds will freeze the motion. This technique is often used in sports photography. The slower the shutter speed becomes, the more blurred the person running becomes in the photograph.

shutter-speed-effect-chart

FROZEN MOTION: FAST SHUTTER SPEED

img_18261img_2656

BLURRED MOTION:SLOW SHUTTER SPEED

img_20160824_221211img_3232

GOAL: Using the Tv (Shutter Priority Mode) complete 10 photographs. Take 5 using a fast shutter speed and take 5 using a slow shutter speed. Title the assignment Shutter Priority and upload Motion Blur for slow speeds and Frozen Motion for fast speeds.

A beginning course that teaches students how to use a digital camera & digital darkroom skills

Designed to educate students on how to use industry standard digital editing software, hardware and digital camera equipment. Instruction in design, rules of composition, history of photography, master photographers and careers in photography are covered. The CA Visual Art Standards create the framework for students learning skills related to digital camera uses.

Aperture & Depth of Field

1) What is Aperture?

Simply put, aperture is a hole within a lens, through which light travels into the camera body. It is easier to understand the concept if you just think about our eyes. Every camera that we know of today is designed like human eyes. The cornea in our eyes is like the front element of a lens – it gathers all external light, then bends it and passes it to the iris. Depending on the amount of light, the iris can either expand or shrink, controlling the size of the pupil, which is a hole that lets the light pass further into the eye. The pupil is essentially what we refer to as aperture in photography. The amount of light that enters the retina (which works just like the camera sensor), is limited to the size of the pupil – the larger the pupil, the more light enters the retina.

2) Size of Aperture – Large vs Small Aperture

The iris of the lens that controls the size (diameter) of the aperture is called “diaphragm” in optics. The sole purpose of the diaphragm is to block or stop all light, with the exception of the light that goes through the aperture. In photography, aperture is expressed in f-numbers (for example f/5.6). These f-numbers that are known as “f-stops” are a way of describing the size of the aperture, or how open or closed the aperture is. A smaller f-stop means a larger aperture, while a larger f-stop means a smaller aperture. Most people find this awkward, since we are used to having larger numbers represent larger values, but not in this case. For example, f/1.4 is larger than f/2.0 and much larger than f/8.0.

dof.png

                                        f/29                                          f/5.6

3) What is Depth of Field?

One important thing to remember here, the size of the aperture has a direct impact on the depth of field, which is the area of the image that appears sharp. A large f-number such as f/32, (which means a smaller aperture) will bring all foreground and background objects in focus, while a small f-number such as f/1.4 will isolate the foreground from the background by making the foreground objects sharp and the background blurry.

GOAL: Using the Av (APERTURE PRIORITY MODE) complete 10 photographs using the same subject but one with the lowest f/stop and the other with the highest f/stop. Upload the photos side-by-side to compare and contrast the depth of field. (Total due 20 images)

Vantage Points and Frame

 

(Courtesy Daniel Solomon)
Daniel Solomon

Vantage Point and Frame are essential choices that must be made by photographers no matter what their ultimate goal for image making.

This act of choosing what to include and exclude, what is our central focus and what is on the periphery (outside the frame), as well as the vantage point and point of view of the camera provides context and meaning. The use of the photographic frame as constructed in the camera’s viewfinder is central to reflecting the intentional visual and conceptual concerns in how photographic meaning is considered.

Give particular attention to your use of the photographic frame and your vantage points

  1. Shoot From A Low Angle: Bug/Worm’s Eye View

Shooting from a low angle is probably the most popular alternative to eye-level perspective photography. It can be challenging because you may have to squat, sit, kneel or lie down to capture your image. It’s worth the effort because it provides an out-of-the-ordinary look at your subject and the results can be stunning.

img_1411
Saul Gonzalez
_MG_8760
Saturday, Juan Talavera, age 3, left, and his brother Carlos, age 2, right, try some cotton candy from the midway at the Humboldt County Fairgrounds. Daniel Solomon/The Eureka Reporter

 

Start by identifying your subject and find a low angle to shoot from. You might even want to place your camera or iPhone on the ground for additional support. You can use leading lines or anything in the foreground to draw the viewer into your image.

Focus on the interesting angles you find when your camera is really close to the ground or better yet, on the ground, level with or looking up at your subject. You could also experiment with flipping your iPhone so the camera lens is closer to the ground. This will provide an even stronger low-angle effect.

  1. Shoot From A High Angle: Bird’s Eye View

Looking down towards your subject is another way to get a new and unique angle with your perspective photography. You don’t necessarily need to climb to the top of a building to accomplish this, but that is one popular possibility. In fact, if you can gain access to the upper floors or the roof of a tall building, you can discover some amazing vantage points.

img_2673
Hannah Vega

There are other ways to get above your subject, whether you’re standing on something that gives you a little lift or if you’re just naturally taller than your subject. It could be as simple as looking down into the cup of coffee you’re holding, with your feet and the ground beneath them included for depth.

 

You could also try this technique with portraits by having your subject lie on the ground or sit and look up at the camera. Just be sure the angle flatters them and enhances their appearance.

Go above and beyond your typical habits and present your surroundings from top to bottom. The view you create might serve as an exciting new perspective that you can use again and again, improving your photography in the process.

camera-FRAME

GOAL: While paying attention to your FRAME complete 5 Bird’s Eye View and 5 Bug’s Eye View photographs and upload the best to your individual websites. Title the assignment VANTAGE POINT AND FRAME

BUG’S EYE VIEW and insert your 5 photos

BIRD’S EYE VIEW and insert your 5 photos