A beginning course that teaches students how to use a digital camera & digital darkroom skills

Designed to educate students on how to use industry standard digital editing software, hardware and digital camera equipment. Instruction in design, rules of composition, history of photography, master photographers and careers in photography are covered. The CA Visual Art Standards create the framework for students learning skills related to digital camera uses.

OH SNAP! WORD (ALPHA PHOTOGRAPHY)

For this assignment you will look for naturally occurring letters or manufactured products where letters appear. NO SIGNS, CLOTHING, BILLBOARDS…etc. Observe the worl around you and using the cameras on campus and at home do your best to find letters that will form words. We will create the words when we upload to your wordpress site.

GOAL: Photograph letters you find and create 5 words (minimum of 4-5 letters per word)

CLONE PHOTOGRAPHY CLONE PHOTOGRAPHY CLONE PHOTOGRAPHY

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MAKING A CLONE

Using the Photoshop Layers and MASK techniques learned previously we will be able to combine multiple photographs as layers and reveal the CLONES.

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By taking multiple photos with your body in different areas of the frame we will combine them in Photoshop. Start with two images and drag one on top of the other. Add a mask to Layer 1 and paint black into the mask to hide the area where your body is located in the Background layer. Once done please flatten the layer and then repeat with the next image.

BORN INTO BROTHELS: Documentary Film

KidsShooting2

https://tubitv.com/movies/506267/born-into-brothels-calcutta-s-red-light-kids

GROUP DISCUSSION GUIDE

In your Photography Teams answer the following questions below and  SCRIBE post to your website

1. What human rights issues are illustrated in the film?

2. In the beginning credits of the film, we see images of the children’s eyes looking
down on images of the red light district. What themes do these images reflect?
What does it tell the viewer about the children?

3. What are the changes in the children’s outlook and personalities when they are
taken out of the brothel to the beach and zoo?

4. If these children were taken out of the brothel environment permanently, do you
think that they could fully recover from the injustices and trauma that they have
previously faced? Why? Why not?

5. If life in the brothels is all the children have ever known, then how do they know
that it is not how they want to live? If it has become the norm, then how do they
know that it is not normal for a child to grow up in that environment? Are we born
with an internal human rights’ radar? Is awareness of human rights a part of human
nature?

6. Why did Zana become so involved with these children? What lessons did Zana
learn throughout her journey? There were times when Zana seemed to get very
frustrated with the bureaucracy in India. What do you think kept her going?

7. Zana is not just documenting these children, but she is enabling them to document
what they see around them. What opportunity does this provide for them?

On your own please respond and explain your answers (THIS IS NOT FOR YES/NO ANSWERS!)

• What does it mean to have the right to education?
• What challenges do these children face in claiming their right to education?
• Should the possibility of being HIV positive affect your right to an education?
• Should your economic or social status affect your right to an education?
• Should being the child of a sex-worker take away that right?
• Explain your answers.

Levitation Photography

jasmine-flotando

Levitation Photography

You may have not heard of the terminology, but you must have definitely seen some stunning levitation photography on the internet. In levitation pictures, everything seems to be defying gravity. The model is floating, the objects around are floating and everything is floating.

Levitation photography is a simple concept of layer masking in Photoshop. To break it down in simple terms, a picture of the scene is taken without any props and models. Later, several pictures are taken with the model and the props by suspending them in air. Then they are all brought together in Photoshop by layer masking to form one image after eliminating the suspending equipment using the first image of the blank scene

There are two phases to creating a levitation shot. Shooting and post-processing.

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Shooting

1. Work up a scene

Levitation photography is a creative process. You don’t actually need a pricey camera for it, even a basic point and shoot camera will help you create a good levitation photograph. Just work up a good scene. Think of various different positions in which you can make your model float in the air and how is it that you will do it. Normal methods which photographers use to suspend their model are:

  • Using stools, tables, chairs or any other furniture for support.
  • Using ropes. Use real strong ones so they can support the weight of the model.
  • Using a trampoline or jump method, ask your model to jump up in the air while making the desired pose. Use burst mode to capture shots in succession.
2. Set-up your camera

Apart from the trampoline method, if you are using any other support methods to keep you model suspended in the air, then you will have to use the tripod. Set your focus on the model and compose your scene to start shooting. Before you start taking pictures of the model, it’s best to take a picture of the blank scene.

It’s a good strategy to include some props as well in your picture. It creates a better impact and adds to the story behind your scene.

Once you have taken all the necessary shots, move on to processing your images and creating your levitation photograph.

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Processing

  1. Import all your images in Photoshop. You will be moving the image with props and subject levitating on to the blank background. Notice the photo’s are in different tabs. Follow the instructions given.
  2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nyuyo9AXGl0

PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN

BALANCE

Just like you wouldn’t eat your three meals of the day in the morning, you don’t want to pack all your elements in only one area of your composition. That’s what balance is: making sure that the visual weight is equally distributed in your design.

To be precise, there are three types of balance:

  • Symmetrical balance: The elements of one side of the composition are strictly similar to those of the other side. This option naturally evokes classicism and constancy – like the pillars of a Greek temple.
  • Asymmetrical balance: The elements on both sides are different, but still give a feeling of having the same “weight”. This is achieved by playing with the colors, textures, shapes and positions of the items. For example, a small object can balance a bigger one if its color is darker, or its texture is more contrasted. This type of balance evokes modernism and vitality.
  • Radial balance: The elements are equally positioned all around the central point of the design, like if they were radiating out from it. This option gives a strong sense of life and dynamism.

EMPHASIS

It occurs when an artist creates an area that is visually dominant in the composition. It’s often achieved by means of contrast, but not exclusively. Every design should incorporate a primary element like this, known as a “focal point”, that will serve as a door through which the viewer can enter the composition.

RHYTHM & MOVEMENT

Life is like a riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving”, once said Einstein. The exact same goes for your composition. For your viewers to enjoy it to the fullest, they have to “move” within your design. This is why a good creation always incorporates a path, which seamlessly leads the eye from one element to another, while communicating the proper information.

REPETITION OR PATTERN

Repetition = boring? Think again. A repeated element can create a pattern that is highly satisfactory. Repetition helps to create consistency, which is crucial when it comes to enforce the unity of your composition. Pattern or rhythm is simply repeating an element in such a manner. This will cause the viewer’s eye to move around to each element.

UNITY

Unity in design exists when all elements are in agreement. It creates a sense of completeness, and completion. To achieve this precious state of harmony, the designer needs to make sure that every element really belongs to the composition, with a specific place and role. Nothing should be useless or placed randomly.

PROPORTION

Proportion is the visual size and weight of elements in a composition and how they relate to each other. Proportion is using the size of an object to give it more or less importance. Proportion can be achieved only if all elements of your design are well-sized and thoughtfully placed.

VARIETY

Variety is exactly what it sounds like, having variety in your elements. Combines different shapes, forms, textures, values and sizes to create interesting compositions.

GOAL: You will create a set of 5 photographs for each Principle of Design. Please title your assignment Principle of Design then type your principle and it’s definition along with your 5 photographs the represent the principle of design visually. There are 7 Principle’s of Design so you should have 35 wonderful visual examples.

PHOTOGRAPHIC ELEMENTS OF ART

LINE

Line is the most important element of all and also the most strongest in its meaning. Your eyes follow the line whether it is visible or invisible. Based on its character and direction, lines communicate emotions making it one of the strongest elements of design.

Horizontal lines suggest feeling of restfulness or calmness, vertical lines suggest feeling of power, and diagonal lines suggest feeling of movement and direction. Soft curved lines represents relaxing or soothing feel whereas acute or jagged lines suggest frenzy or chaotic feeling and so on.

SHAPE

Shape is a two dimensional representation of an object. Kids draw primarily using the shapes like an outline of a farm house, a tree, sun, etc. The outer line of an object forms the shape.

In photography, you can represent interesting shapes of the objects by using silhouette effect due to backlighting. Silhouette photographs make an impact when the shape of the subject (object) is clearly defined in contrast with the background.

FORM

Form is a three dimensional representation of an object. A third dimension (thickness) to the Shape yields Form.

Photography (and art) is a two dimensional form lacking the depth which poses a challenge to  you as a photographer to somehow represent the third dimension by creating an illusion of depth.

By using light and shadow you can create an illusion of depth in your photograph.

TEXTURE

Texture represents the details that are present on the surface of an object. You can use texture to create photographs that are visually interesting.

Direction of light plays an important role in bringing out the textures. Based on the mood you want to convey in your photograph, you will either wait for the light that will emphasize the roughness or softness of an object.

COLOR

Color is a major design element that we love. Colors play an important role to set the mood of the photograph.

The colors can be broadly classified as warm colors and cool colors. Red, Orange, and Yellow are the warm colors that suggest the feeling of warmth, liveliness, and energetic whereas Blue and Green are cool colors that suggest the feeling of calmness, tranquility, and sad/gloomy.

SPACE

Space is another important element of design that suggests the distance between the objects, perspective, and proportions of objects.

A subject represents the positive space in an image and the background represents the negative space. Negative space is as important as the positive space in defining the shape of the subject.

VALUE

The lightness or darkness of tones or colors. White is the lightest value; black is the darkest. The value halfway between these extremes is called middle gray. Values help create forms and differentiate space or distance. Gradation of values within a space or shape create forms, or the illusion of volume and mass.

GOAL: You will create a set of 5 photographs for each Element of Art. Please title your assignment Elements of Art then type your element and it’s definition along with your 5 photographs the represent the element visually. There are 7 Elements of Art so you should have 35 wonderful visual examples.

Light Painting Photography

Light Painting Photography

Light orbs, fire wheels, light drawings, 3D light extrusions and more – they are all heaps of fun, super creative and surprisingly easy to do! There is no hard and fast rules for how to do them, but here is what works well.

Saul Gonzalez Light Painting 2

https://www.canon-europe.com/get-inspired/tips-and-techniques/light-painting-photography/

All you need is your Camera, a tripod, some kind of light, maybe some string, LED lights, flashlights, Christmas lights or Light Sabers!

  1. Get your camera on a tripod: Yep, you do need one, or at least, a place to rest the camera so that it doesn’t move during the photo, which can be quite a long time – 5, 10, 15, 30 seconds or even longer!
  1. Frame up your shot: Best to do this now, before you start focusing etc., because on some lenses when you start zooming in and out to compose your shot, it throws off your carefully pre-set focus you will be doing next. Don’t forget to use MANUAL FOCUS and ensure that you’re shooting wide enough to fit in your whole intended light drawing.

Focusing: The basic trick here is that you have to pre-focus your camera with Manual Focus to ‘lock in’ the focus before you start taking shots, because as usual in these low-light situations, the camera will often struggle to find anything to focus on if you just leave it to it’s own devices. It’s easier to pre-focus with a friend – get them to go and stand where you’re intending to do your light painting, and then have them shine a torch or something at the camera, or alternatively you shine a torch on them to make them visible – either way, it should be pretty easy to focus on the lit subject.

  1. Camera settings: I’d recommend using TV mode on your camera’s Mode Dial (this is the same as ‘S’ mode on non-Canon cameras). This is the mode where you select whatever length of shutter speed you want, and the camera works out what aperture /f # must go with that to produce a correctly exposed image.
  1. Scroll your shutter speed out to whatever length you think you will require to do your light painting. Better too long than too short! 10 seconds (looks like 10 ” on the camera display) is plenty for a simple light drawing. Bigger more complex light painted scenes can take 30 seconds or more!
  1. As for your ISO take it off the AUTO setting and try setting it to 100 or 200. This will allow the colors of the lights to much more vibrant and visible. If you would like to see more of the subject/person holding the light use a higher ISO like 400.

Saul Gonzalez Light Painting 3

This is super easy – in theory! Pretty much all you’re doing is drawing an image in mid air with some kind of glowing light source (like a flash light, or it could be a glow stick, or whatever) and the path your light follows will trace itself into your photograph as a glowing trail. It’s actually harder than it looks to remember where you’ve already drawn – it’s like trying to draw with your eyes closed, but practice makes perfect.

https://www.canon-europe.com/get-inspired/tips-and-techniques/light-painting-photography/

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GOAL: You will complete 6 beautiful light painting photograph’s for this assignment. Start small and easy, for example your initials or a smiley face, then work up to more creative imagery.


DIPTYCH & TRIPTYCH PHOTOGRAPHY

DIPTYCH & TRIPTYCH PHOTOGRAPHY

Diptychs are two photographs; Triptychs are three that have been placed together to tell a single, intertwining story. While diptychs can be as unique as their creator’s imagination, the most popular ones can tell a simple story.

Photography is about visual communication: sharing stories, ideas, and feelings through images. A diptych of two images, or parts of two images, is an impact full storytelling tool. Look for thematic, composition, and other visual synergies that will make your diptychs more powerful than the sum of their parts.

Diptych and triptych come from the Greek meaning two (dip) or three (trip) fold (tych). Many modern artists create pieces that are designed to be on display together and the diptych and triptych have become very popular story telling devices.

As well as being great story-telling devices, diptychs and triptychs are visually pleasing and help make use of photos that may not work on their own.

Collecting Acorns

There is no right or wrong when it comes to these composites so play, have fun and put together whatever feels right. Think complimentary images or think completely opposite images! Try color combinations, pictures with a running theme, things that show movement or photos that show the passage of time. The possibilities are endless!

GOAL: You will complete 6 sets of Diptych or Triptych combinations. You can choose to complete 6 diptych or 6 triptych combinations or a mix of both.